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Haim Omer | Dan Dolberger |
  • Family Process, Vol. x, No. x, 2015 © 2015 Family Process Institute
    doi: 10.1111/famp.12129

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: Other
Abstract:

Parent training in nonviolent resistance was adapted to deal with situations of suicide threat by children, adolescents, and young adults. The approach aims at reducing the risk potential and the mutual distress surrounding the threat-interaction. Parent training in nonviolent resistance has been shown to help parents move from helplessness to presence, from isolation to connectedness, from submission to resistance, from escalation to self-control, and from mutual distancing and hostility to care and support. Those emphases can be crucial for the diminution of suicide risk. Parents show good ability to implement the approach and report gains on various areas over and beyond the reduction in suicide threat. A particular advantage is that the method can be used also in cases where the young person threatening suicide is not willing to cooperate.

Haim Omer | Sarit STEINMETZ | TAL CARTHY | ARIST VON SCHLIPPE |
  • Family Process, Vol. 52, No. 2, 2013

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: General
Abstract:

Descriptions of parental authority and of the formation of a secure parent-child bond have remained unconnected in conceptualizations about parenting and child development. [wpex Read more]The parental anchoring function is here presented as an integrative metaphor for the two fields. Parents who fulfill an anchoring function offer a secure relational frame for the child, while also manifesting a stabilizing and legitimate kind of authority. The anchoring function enriches the two fields by: (1) adding a dimension of authority to the acknowledged functions of the safe haven and the secure base that are seen as core to a secure parent-child bond, and (2) adding considerations about the parent-child bond to Baumrind’s classical description of authoritative parenting.[/wpex]

Haim Omer | Haneen Farah | Oren Musicant | Yaara Shimshoni | Tomer Toledano | Einat Grimberg | Tsippy Lotan |
  • Accident Analysis and Prevention, Nov 27 , 2013, No Pagination Specified. doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2013.11.005

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: Risky driving
Abstract:

This study focuses on investigating the driving behavior of young novice male drivers during the first year of driving (three months of accompanied driving and the following nine months of solo driving). [wpex Read more] The study's objective is to examine the potential of various feedback forms on driving to affect young drivers’ behavior and to mitigate the transition from accompanied to solo driving. The study examines also the utility of providing parents with guidance on how to exercise vigilant care regarding their teens’ driving.[/wpex]

Eli R. Lebowitz | Haim Omer | Holly Hermes | Lawrence Scahill |
  • Cognitive and Behavioral Practice (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpra.2013.10.004

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: Anxiety disorders (OCD)
Abstract:

In this treatment development report we present the theoretical foundation, structure, and strategies of a novel parent-based intervention for childhood anxiety disorders. [wpex Read more] We will also present the results of an open trial of the treatment, with an emphasis on feasibility, acceptability, and initial outcomes. Participants in the trial were parents of 10 children, aged 9 to 13. Children had declined individual child treatment. Multiple excerpts from the treatment manual are included with the hope of “bringing the treatment to life” and conveying a rich sense of the therapeutic process. Parents participated in 10 weekly sessions. Significant improvement was reported in child anxiety and family accommodation as well as in the child’s motivation for individual treatment. No parents dropped out and satisfaction was high. The SPACE Program (Supportive Parenting for Anxious Childhood Emotions) is a novel, manualized parent-based intervention that is feasible and acceptable and may be effective in improving childhood anxiety.[/wpex]

Eli Leibowitz | Dan Dolberger | Efi Nortov | Haim Omer |
  • Fam Proc 51:90–106, 2012

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: Entitled dependence
Abstract:

Adult entitled dependence” is a condition characterized by the extreme dependence of grown children on their family and by levels of dysfunction, seemingly excessive in light of their apparent capacity to function. [wpex Read more]The family and the dependent adult become involved in an interaction in which the very attempts to alleviate the problem may aggravate it. Parent-training in nonviolent resistance (NVR) is an intervention that has been shown to be helpful to parents of behaviorally disturbed youth. Parent training in NVR offers parents means to shift away from a stance of helplessness toward realistic goals that are accomplishable without the collaboration of their offspring. We report on the parents of 27 entitled dependent grown children who participated in parent training in NVR. Additionally, we present 2 detailed case studies that exemplify the problem and the therapeutic process.

Before treatment, the dependent adults were not working or studying, drew heavily on parental services (financial or otherwise), and were resistant to parental attempts to change the situation. Most parents succeeded in overcoming their helplessness and reducing the provision of parental services. In a considerable proportion of cases, the grown children started working or studying or moved to independent lodgings.

[/wpex]

Dan Dolberger | Haim Omer | Efi Nortov |
  • Fam Proc 51:90–106, 2012

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: Entitled dependence
Abstract:

La dépendance de l'enfant adulte est une affection caractérisée par la dépendance extrême d'un adulte envers sa famille et par un niveau dysfonctionnel semblant disproportionné au regard de sa capacité réelle à fonctionner. [wpex Read more] L'adulte dépendant et sa famille se retrouvent imbriqués dans une relation qui s'aggrave à chaque tentative d'atténuer le problème. La formation à la résistance non violente (NVR)1 constitue une aide précieuse pour les parents confrontés au comportement perturbé de leur enfant La formation à la NVR offre aux parents un moyen de se libérer d'une situation dominée par un sentiment d'impuissance et d'atteindre des buts réalistes et réalisables sans la collaboration de leur progéniture. Nous pouvons rapporter les résultats obtenus auprès des parents de vingt-sept adultes dépendants ayant participé à la formation NVR. Nous présentons de surcroit deux cas d'étude détaillés qui illustrent la problématique et le processus thérapeutique. Avant le traitement, les adultes dépendants ne travaillaient ni n'étudiaient, se reposaient exagérément sur les services fournis par leurs parents (financiers ou autres) et résistaient à toute tentative de leurs parents d'introduire le moindre changement à cet état de fait. La plupart des parents ont réussi à surmonter leur impuissance et à réduire la mise à disposition de services. Dans un nombre considérable de cas, les enfants adultes ont commencé à travailler ou à étudier et ont déménagé.[/wpex]

Eli Lebowitz | Haim Omer | James Leckman |
  • DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY 28 : 899–905 (2011)

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: Anxiety disorders (OCD)
Abstract:

This study explored the nature of disruptive and coercive behaviors in pediatric obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). [wpex Read more]Method: Thirty children with OCD and a disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) were compared to
30 children with DBD alone using the Child Behavior Checklist and a novel 18-item questionnaire focused on distinctive coercive and disruptive behaviors seen in pediatric OCD (CD-POC). Results: Although youth with DBD alone had higher ratings of Externalizing Behaviors on the CBCL compared to the youth with OCD1DBD, their ratings on the CB-POC scale were lower. For example, 83% of OCD1DBD parents reported that their child ‘‘Imposes rules or behaviors on others due to tactile or other sensitivity and reacts to disobedience with rage or violence (e.g. forbids certain sounds, demands specific temperature settings)’’ compared to 23% of the parents of youth with DBD alone. Other highly discriminating behaviors included: ‘‘Demands special ‘cuddling’ or ritualized contact without regard for the will of others’’ and ‘‘Forbids the use of objects in his/her vicinity because of feelings of fear or disgust (e.g. knives, scissors, creams).’’ Total scores on the CD-POC were also correlated with OCD severity (Po.01). Conclusion: The results suggest that the nature of DBD in pediatric OCD may be distinctive and worthy of further study.[/wpex]

Barbara Ollefs | Arist von Schlieppe | Haim Omer | Jürgen Kriz |
  • Familiendynamik, Vol 34(3), 2009, 256-265

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: Externalizing behavior problems
Abstract:

When compared with training in a "TEEN Triple P program" and a waiting control group, does parental coaching in non-violent resistance enhance "parental presence" and de-escalating conflict behavior, while reducing "parental helplessness"? [wpex Read more]Do parents change their perspectives on the external problem behavior of their adolescent children? The study presented here (similar in design to a pre-post test) compares three groups: 59 parents in the "parental coaching in non-violent resistance" group, 21 parents who had previously participated in a Triple- P program, and 9 parents waiting for an intervention. The children (11-18 years) displayed rebellious, aggressive, and dissocial behavior problems or attention disorders. Four questionnaires were used: 1. Questionnaire on Parental Presence (an instrument supplied by our research group), 2. Child Behavior Checklist (4-18 years), 3. Beck's Depression Inventory, 4. Questionnaire on Upbringing Behavior for Adolescents. For both intervention groups the results indicate a significant improvement in "parental presence," an improvement in upbringing behavior, and a significant reduction of "parental helplessness" and "parental depression." In addition, a significant improvement in the "external behavior problems" of adolescents, as seen by their parents, was observed in the parental coaching group. Psychometric validation of the parental presence questionnaire indicated a significant correlation with the other instruments used.[/wpex]

Haim Omer | Arist von Schlieppe |
  • Familiendynamik, Vol 34(3), 2009, 246-254

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: General
Abstract:

The article discusses the principles of parental presence and non-violent resistance from the perspective of attachment theory.

[wpex Read more]The "new authority" advocated in our model of "parental coaching" revolves not around the control of the child but around the restoration of impaired attachment between parents and their children. The child's awareness of psychological security is furthered by reliable presence, watchful care, endurance, and persistence on the part of the parents. New potentialities in the relationship between parents and children are opened up via an emphasis on parental self-control rather than control over the child, endurance rather than immediate retaliation, transparency and networking rather than a strict hierarchy, and reconciliation as opposed to reward and punishment mechanisms. The idea behind the approach is for parents to develop "working models" that subscribe to a logic of relatedness rather than a logic of control.[/wpex]

Haim Omer | Irit Schorr-Sapir | Uri Weinblatt |
  • Journal of Family Therapy (2008) 30: 450–464

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: Externalizing behavior problems
Abstract:

A parent-training approach to the treatment of violence against siblings according to the principles of non-violent resistance was developed aiming at resisting the violence, providing protection to the victims and reducing escalation between the parents and the violent child.

Haim Omer | Uri Weinblatt |
  • Journal of Marital and Family Therapy January 2008, Vol. 34, No. 1, 75–92

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: Externalizing behavior problems
Abstract:

Nonviolent resistance (NVR) is a new training model aimed at helping parents deal effectively with their helplessness, isolation, and escalatory interactions with their children. [wpex Read more]The purpose of this study is to evaluate training in NVR with the parents of children with acute behavior problems. Seventy-three parents (41 families) were randomly assigned to a treatment group and wait-list control group. Measures were taken at pretreatment, posttreatment, and a 1-month follow-up. In comparison with the wait-list group, parents who received training in NVR showed a decrease in parental helplessness and escalatory behaviors, and an increase in perceived social support. The children’s negative behaviors as assessed by the parents also decreased significantly.[/wpex]

Haim Omer |
  • Family Process, Vol. 40, No. 1, 2001

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: Externalizing behavior problems
Abstract:
There are two kinds of escalation between parents and children with acute discipline problems:  (a) complementary escalation, in which parental giving-in leads to a progressive increase in the child’s demands, and  [wpex Read more] (b) reciprocal escalation, in which hostility begets hostility.  Extant programs for helping parents deal with children with such problems focus mainly on one kind of escalation to the neglect of the other. The systematic use of Gandhi’s principle of “nonviolent resistance” allows for a parental attitude that counters both kinds of escalation. An intervention is described, which allows parents to put this principle into practice. [/wpex ]
 

Haim Omer | Irit Shor Sapir | Uri Weinbaltt |
  • Thérapie Familiale: Revue Internationale en Approche Systémique, Vol 28(1), 2007

  • Type: Published article
  • Application Field: Externalizing behavior problems
Abstract:

A parent-training approach to the treatment of violence against siblings according to the principles of non-violent resistance [wpex Read more] was developed aiming at providing protection to the victims, reducing escalation between the parents and the violent child, and propitiating the positive elements in the relationship with the aggressive child. The major principles and strategies on which the program was based were: an increase in parental presence, a series of procedures for resisting violence and countering escalation, and the mobilization support. Non-violent resistance helps the parents relinquish the power of violence and humiliating sanctions, opting instead for a concrete power base constituted by parental presence and persistance, social support, and moral authority.[/wpex]